“Lo and behold, there was actually an image in there.” Criterion’s techinical director talks restoration

Restoration is an important component of any film preservation and re-release process, especially the high-quality efforts from the Criterion Collection. Those of us without professional archival training never get a good idea of what happens during this mysterious process. Do they scan the original film? What sort of tools do they use to clean dirt … Continue reading ““Lo and behold, there was actually an image in there.” Criterion’s techinical director talks restoration”

Restoration is an important component of any film preservation and re-release process, especially the high-quality efforts from the Criterion Collection. Those of us without professional archival training never get a good idea of what happens during this mysterious process. Do they scan the original film? What sort of tools do they use to clean dirt off? What if a film reel is too damaged to use? Surely they don’t just color black-and-white movies with crayons!

Thanks to The A.V. Club, we now have a glimpse into the processing room. In commemoration of the Criterion remastering of the The Apu Trilogy, a masterwork of Indian cinema, The A.V. Club interviewed Criterion’s technical director Lee Kline about how a company restores a sixty-year-old film. The details are shocking; apparently the original copy was damaged in a fire and almost too brittle to play. Kline then goes into the chemistry of film preservation, as well as the tedious process of cleaning up scratches.

Just reading about the work that went into The Apu Trilogy‘s restoration stresses us out, so we’re it was handled by someone with skill. Maybe you won’t be grossed out reading about the nasty vinegar smell of rotting film – and maybe this line of work seems like something you’d want to do! We at least hope Kline’s interview helps you appreciate the enormous effort spent on saving global cultural heritage.

So long, farewell to our seniors!

Now comes the difficult part of every year when we say farewell to our departing senior staff. This year, we have five staff members graduating: Caitlin, Claire, Jasmine, Travis, and Trevor. We’ve gotten to know this crew over the past several years, and they’ve done a terrific job exceeding patron expectations of great library service. … Continue reading “So long, farewell to our seniors!”

Now comes the difficult part of every year when we say farewell to our departing senior staff. This year, we have five staff members graduating: Caitlin, Claire, Jasmine, Travis, and Trevor. We’ve gotten to know this crew over the past several years, and they’ve done a terrific job exceeding patron expectations of great library service.

We’re sad to see them go, but we know they’re moving onto exciting careers and future programs. We wish them the best of luck!

School’s out! Christen the end of the year with summer vacation movies

In just a few hours, the 2014-2015 academic year comes to a close. We’ve enjoyed this decidedly busy year, but like you, we’re looking forward to cutting back our workload a little. More importantly, we’re sure everyone is looking forward to taking some time off for a little vacation, no matter how big or small. … Continue reading “School’s out! Christen the end of the year with summer vacation movies”

In just a few hours, the 2014-2015 academic year comes to a close. We’ve enjoyed this decidedly busy year, but like you, we’re looking forward to cutting back our workload a little. More importantly, we’re sure everyone is looking forward to taking some time off for a little vacation, no matter how big or small. And given the beautiful weather, we’re giddy thinking about the summer to come. What better way to stoke that excitement than to recommend a few summer-themed movies.

An infinite number of vacation movies and television shows exist, so we winnowed our selections down to a handful that we can learn something from. Everyone’s summer experience is different, but there are enough unifying themes – travel, emotions, and friendship – that we could make a few recommendations that most everyone should connect to.

(We aren’t actually offering these movies and TV episodes as life models, and in most cases, you should probably avoid doing whatever their characters choose. The one exception is the streaming video about travel photography; that one is very useful!)

Wet Hot American SummerHU DVD 1506
The lesson: Don’t be the one to make a grand confessional on the last day of summer; it’s cliched.

SummertimeHU DVD 3964
The lesson: Summer love, though fleeting, can be trouble.

Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!: Season 2, Episode 1, “Vacation” – HU DVD 4026
The lesson: Make new friends, preferably if they have dreads and make a video of your summer.

AdventurelandHU DVD 6464
The lesson: A summer job isn’t so bad, and you might get something more out of it than money.

The Way Way BackHU DVD 8478
The lesson: Take the family trip, even if your stepfather is a jerk.

The Office: Season 3, Episode 22, “Beach Games” – HU DVD 14156
The lesson: Improve your trip to the beach with competitive eating and sumo wrestling.

Travel: How to Take Stunning PhotosStreaming video
The lesson: Remember to bring your camera… but use it well.

Hot SummerHU DVD 495
No lesson here, but we bet you haven’t watched this Germany summer vacation musical. 

State film tax credits on the chopping block

Tax incentives are often the saving grace of film productions. If a local film board gives you incentive to film your upcoming production on-site, you’d be silly not to at least consider its possible budget alleviation. That’s why House of Cards films many of its scenes in Baltimore. It brings commerce and attention to states … Continue reading “State film tax credits on the chopping block”

Tax incentives are often the saving grace of film productions. If a local film board gives you incentive to film your upcoming production on-site, you’d be silly not to at least consider its possible budget alleviation. That’s why House of Cards films many of its scenes in Baltimore. It brings commerce and attention to states and helps filmmakers stay afloat, but many argue that like the Olympics, these productions cost more in goodwill and hassle than they bring in.

Perhaps those criticisms have become the consensus, as multiple states are now considering cutting their film credits. MinnPost reports that Minnesota legislators are now considering rescinding the state’s $10 million film incentives. The state has apparently struggled with its budget in recent years, and with competing incentives from Canada attracting productions like Fargo, lawmakers don’t easily notice the return investment of luring film crews. (Minnesota’s film board says $4.6 million of credits brought nearly $30 million into the state.)

A similar conflict is underway in Massachusetts, where Governor Charlie Baker wants to put those credits into income tax rebates rather than supporting out-of-state businesses. As with Minnesota, this is a difficult argument to suss out, as the impacts of film production (positive or negative) are challenging to determine.

The shuttering of some local credits may not have a noticeable impact on the quality of films and television shows; those will still get made somewhere. But California and New York’s unquestioned dominance of the production industry would have a negative ripple effect throughout the business. Local film board and production houses would struggle to stay afloat, and we’d have to get used to seeing more palm trees and New York skylines in all of our media.