85 films Martin Scorsese says you should see

Martin Scorsese did a four hour interview with Fast Company last year for the December/January issue. In the interview he talked a lot about the business of making films and how he’s managed to stay in it and remain relevant for so long. Over the four hours, Scorsese referenced 85 “films you need to see … Continue reading “85 films Martin Scorsese says you should see”

Martin Scorsese did a four hour interview with Fast Company last year for the December/January issue. In the interview he talked a lot about the business of making films and how he’s managed to stay in it and remain relevant for so long.

Over the four hours, Scorsese referenced 85 “films you need to see to know anything about film.” Some films he briefly mentioned, and others he spoke about more in depth. Fast Company compiled a list which includes his direct quotes about the films where applicable, and which provides brief descriptions of the films when quotes weren’t available. This list is being blogged about as a unique film list that’s almost like the ultimate film course designed by a legendary filmmaker. There are some omissions noted by the ArtInfo blog, but they do recognize that he couldn’t list every influential film in history.

Here’s the beginning of Scorsese’s list. Go to Fast Company for the complete list.

Ace in the Hole: “This Billy Wilder film was so tough and brutal in its cynicism that it died a sudden death at the box office, and they re-released it under the title Big Carnival, which didn’t help. Chuck Tatum is a reporter who’s very modern–he’ll do anything to get the story, to make up the story! He risks not only his reputation, but also the life of this guy who’s trapped in the mine.” 1951

All That Heaven Allows: In this Douglas Sirk melodrama, Rock Hudson plays a gardener who falls in love with a society widow played by Jane Wyman. Scandale! 1955

America, America: Drawn directly from director Elia Kazan’s family history, this film offers a passionate, intense view of the challenges faced by Greek immigrants at the end of the 19th century. 1963

An American in Paris: This Vincente Minnelli film, with Gene Kelly, picked up the idea of stopping within a film for a dance from The Red Shoes. 1951

Apocalypse Now: This Francis Ford Coppola masterpiece is from a period when directors like Brian DePalma, John Milius, Paul Schrader, Scorsese and others had great freedom—freedom that they then lost. 1979

Arsenic and Old Lace: Scorsese is a big fan of many Frank Capra movies, and this Cary Grant vehicle is one of several that he’s enjoyed with his family at his office screening room. 1944

The Bad and the Beautiful: Vincente Minnelli directed this film about a cynical Hollywood mogul trying to make a comeback. It stars Kirk Douglas, Lana Turner, Walter Pidgeon and Dick Powell. 1952

The Band Wagon: “It’s my favorite of the Vincente Minnelli musicals. I love the storyline that combines Faust and a musical comedy, and the disaster that results. Tony Hunter, the lead character played by Fred Astaire, is a former vaudeville dancer whose time has passed, and who’s trying to make it on Broadway, which is a very different medium of course. By the time the movie was made, the popularity of the Astaire/Rogers films had waned, raising the question of what are you going to do with Fred Astaire in Technicolor? So, really, Tony Hunter is Fred Astaire–his whole reputation is on the line, and so was Fred Astaire’s.” 1953

Born on the Fourth of July: Produced by Universal Pictures under Tom Pollock and Casey Silver, this Tom Cruise movie (directed by Oliver Stone) was an example of how that studio “wanted to make special pictures,” says Scorsese. 1989

Cape Fear: As he once explained to Stephen Spielberg over dinner in Tribeca, one of Scorsese’s fears about directing a remake of this film was that, “The original was so good. I mean, you’ve got Gregory Peck, Robert Mitchum, Polly Bergen, it’s terrific!” 1962

See more at Fast Company.

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American University Professor Profiles: David Pike

American University Library and the Academic Multimedia Services (AMS) team believe that the faculty at AU possess a wide range of scholarly and practical contributions for the academic and professional world. With Professor Profiles we want to showcase the unique teaching styles, fascinating research and interesting publications by AU professors. Through these Professor Profiles AMS … Continue reading “American University Professor Profiles: David Pike”

American University Library and the Academic Multimedia Services (AMS) team believe that the faculty at AU possess a wide range of scholarly and practical contributions for the academic and professional world. With Professor Profiles we want to showcase the unique teaching styles, fascinating research and interesting publications by AU professors.


Through these Professor Profiles AMS hopes that prospective students and other members of the wider academic community will be compelled to learn more about what AU’s faculty have to offer. The Library and AMS wish for everyone to know more about AU’s faculty and we strive to support professors at every step possible.

DAVID PIKE

How do you think of space as a film maker, or a writer? Do you see space as separate from life and characters or are they apart of each other? For Professor David Pike space, and more specifically subterranean space, is just as important as any character or action and is extremely influential with how characters react to events. And this is the same with real life as it is with fiction. Author of Metropolis on the Styx: The Underworlds of Modern Urban Culture, 1800–2001 and Subterranean Cities: The World beneath Paris and London 1800–1945; Professor Pike uses the modern underworld to explore and analyze how society uses and reacts to the spaces it occupies and controls, as well as how these often subterranean worlds are used in literature and film.


IFC Ranks The Top 50 Opening Title Sequences Of All Time…

http://www.ifc.com/news/2011/02/the-50-greatest-opening-title.php Media Services is home to most of these great films, below are the top ten: Vertigo (1958) DVD 14, VHS 60 A Hard Day’s Night (1964) DVD 5740, VHS 145 Se7en (1995) DVD 22 Touch of Evil (1958) DVD 163 Goldfinger (1964) DVD 4995 The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad! (1988) … Continue reading “IFC Ranks The Top 50 Opening Title Sequences Of All Time…”

Media Services is home to most of these great films, below are the top ten:

Film/Video Citation Guide updated and available on the new library website

Need to cite a film, a TV show, or a YouTube clip for a paper, take a look at our citation guide for examples using MLA 7th, APA 5th, Chicago 15th, and Turabian formats. link

Need to cite a film, a TV show, or a YouTube clip for a paper, take a look at our citation guide for examples using MLA 7th, APA 5th, Chicago 15th, and Turabian formats.

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