Interactive Media: iPhone Development – Updates

Since my last post on this topic a few things have changed. Some good, some not so much… Let’s get the bad news out of the way first. The new iOS SDK is no longer free. That’s right, XCode 4 now costs $5.00 on the AppStore. Oh, and it only runs on Snow Leopard. There … Continue reading “Interactive Media: iPhone Development – Updates”

Since my last post on this topic a few things have changed. Some good, some not so much…

Let’s get the bad news out of the way first.
The new iOS SDK is no longer free. That’s right, XCode 4 now costs $5.00 on the AppStore. Oh, and it only runs on Snow Leopard. There seem to be a few places where you can get older versions of XCode for free, but Apple seems to be sweeping this into a corner. Oh well. I will say though that the new XCode is worth the five bucks. It has a lot of new features that make development much easier. So if you have Snow Leopard you should certainly drop the dough and get XCode 4.
On the upside we have two bits of very good news.
The first is that Apple is really pushing resources for folks to develop Apps for iOS. One example of this is that they have compiled a whole page of iTunes U and podcast resources for development, marketing and business management. There’s some really good stuff here including full courses for iOS development from Stanford and UCDavis. It’s worth your time.
And finally, this Fall Apple will be releasing iOS5. Check out this video on the new features to be introduced.

Interactive Media: iPhone App Development, Step 2.5

Having trouble with Objective-C? Yeah, so did I. Objective-C is a programming language developed by Apple for use in programming for the MacOS and iOS platforms. As you may have guessed, it’s based on C. You might find it helpful to take a few minutes to learn a bit about the C programming language. You … Continue reading “Interactive Media: iPhone App Development, Step 2.5”

Having trouble with Objective-C?

Yeah, so did I.
Objective-C is a programming language developed by Apple for use in programming for the MacOS and iOS platforms. As you may have guessed, it’s based on C.
You might find it helpful to take a few minutes to learn a bit about the C programming language. You can use XCode as a C complier and try out some test programs in C.
The classic text on C is the book written by the folks who created the language and it’s called, strikingly enough, The C Programming Language. You can get it on Amazon.com if you like.
This website also gives a simple introduction to the C language and it’s worth reading through.
One other thing folks often find difficult about Objective-C is the fact that it’s an object-oriented programming (OOP) language. If you’re new to programming and object-oriented language can be difficult to learn. Many volumes have been written about OOP, but what it boils down to is this: a class is like a jello mold. You can fill the mold with different colors and flavors of jello, but what you get each time you turn out the mold is the same shape with the same properties (it wobbles and is tasty). With that in mind, you can think of a class as a blueprint from which copies of similar objects can be created. For more on OOP, check out this website.