Every Frame a Painting turns inward with a look at the editing process

Tony Zhou and Taylor Ramos’s Every Frame a Painting is one of the best film criticism channels on YouTube. The creators are excellent editors, and the attention they put into the pace and structure of the videos shows. Appropriately, this month, Every Frame a Painting’s new video looks at the editing process. Zhou edits films … Continue reading “Every Frame a Painting turns inward with a look at the editing process”

Tony Zhou and Taylor Ramos’s Every Frame a Painting is one of the best film criticism channels on YouTube. The creators are excellent editors, and the attention they put into the pace and structure of the videos shows.

Appropriately, this month, Every Frame a Painting’s new video looks at the editing process. Zhou edits films professionally, but when asked, he has trouble figuring out how to describe the logic behind editing film. As the video describes, it’s all about reading the emotions of the scene. Stories have rhythms and natural beats, and you can cut earlier or later to get a different reaction from the audience. Where you cut a shot can make moments land differently, and figuring out what each scene needs is sometimes just a feeling.

We can’t put it into words much better, so watch the video for some terrific examples of how different editing techniques can change scenes. The examples from From a Few Dollars More, Taxi Driver, and A Brighter Summer Day are particularly interesting and should give you a great idea of the sort of instinctive rhythm that great editors have.

How to make a movie with your smartphone

Times are changing and it appears that smartphones with video capabilities are continually putting once popular pocket video cameras like the FlipCam, the Kodak ZX1, and the Kodak Zi8 out of business. What better time to hone you smartphone cinematography skills? Check out this cool video about shooting video on your smartphone.Seen on BBC Future

Times are changing and it appears that smartphones with video capabilities are continually putting once popular pocket video cameras like the FlipCam, the Kodak ZX1, and the Kodak Zi8 out of business. What better time to hone you smartphone cinematography skills? Check out this cool video about shooting video on your smartphone.
Seen on BBC Future

Are you transitioning from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X? Check out FCPX.tv

Are you transitioning from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X? If so, you really ought to check out this website: FCPX.TV It’s a collection of fixes to common problems, as well as how to’s and keyboard shortcuts for frequently executed operations in Final Cut Pro 7, so you can now learn how … Continue reading “Are you transitioning from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X? Check out FCPX.tv”

Are you transitioning from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X? If so, you really ought to check out this website: FCPX.TV

It’s a collection of fixes to common problems, as well as how to’s and keyboard shortcuts for frequently executed operations in Final Cut Pro 7, so you can now learn how to do those things in Final Cut Pro X. Even if you’re not a Final Cut Pro 7 genius transitioning to FCPX, but maybe an iMovie user trying something new, these tips can help you along in your early days with FCPX.

Famed editor Walter Murch discusses Final Cut Pro X

Final Cut Pro X has been slammed by many, so what’s the point in posting yet another article about it? Well, one question I’ve been asked a lot since the release of FCP X is, “I’m a student, what NLE should I learn?” Before, the answer was easy: Final Cut Pro. Now, not so much. … Continue reading “Famed editor Walter Murch discusses Final Cut Pro X”

Final Cut Pro X has been slammed by many, so what’s the point in posting yet another article about it? Well, one question I’ve been asked a lot since the release of FCP X is, “I’m a student, what NLE should I learn?” Before, the answer was easy: Final Cut Pro. Now, not so much. Should a student commit to FCP X, assuming it will become the future standard despite being woefully incomplete at present, or should they learn Adobe or Avid, assuming Apple’s role in the professional, wage-earning editing world as we know it is over? It’s a tough question, and I’m curious to hear your thoughts in the comments. In the meantime, here’s famed editor Walter Murch (The Conversation, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather II, and The English Patient among many others) talking about the X at the Boston Supermeet.
As seen on NoFilmSchool.

Check out WeVideo, the collaborative online video editor in the cloud

WeVideoA free video editing and hosting site. Allows for social editing – a project can have content submitted by and be edited by multiple users. Simply shoot videos and photos with your mobile phone or camera. Then upload them to your personal or shared WeVideo media library. You can shape your story alone or together … Continue reading “Check out WeVideo, the collaborative online video editor in the cloud”

WeVideo
A free video editing and hosting site. Allows for social editing – a project can have content submitted by and be edited by multiple users.

Simply shoot videos and photos with your mobile phone or camera. Then upload them to your personal or shared WeVideo media library.


You can shape your story alone or together with others on the WeVideo canvas. You can add titles, effects, animation, music, narration and more to create your own video story.


We make it easy to share your video story in the WeVideo studio. Or publish your finished video to your favorite social-networking or video-sharing website, from basic to high-definition broadcast quality.



Here’s how it works:
With WeVideo, you simply upload your video clips, create your storylines, and edit them in the cloud. There’s no software to download. All video-story creation takes place in the Internet browser on your smartphone, tablet, or computer. And with WeVideo, you can collaborate on video stories by inviting others to upload their clips to your cloud-based video library. You can co-create a video with others or come up with your own separate versions. Once created, you can share your video in internet or high-definition broadcast quality on the WeVideo site or publish it to your favorite video-sharing, social-network, or other online site.