Five Films Featuring…One Actor Playing Two Roles In The Same Frame…PART TWO!!!

Oh my gosh, this one was so popular that I’m actually going to do an update. Here, according to our staff, are yet MORE movies featuring one actor playing two roles in the same frame, though we’ll just have to trust our collective memory on this one, because I can’t find pictures for some: Scott … Continue reading “Five Films Featuring…One Actor Playing Two Roles In The Same Frame…PART TWO!!!”

Oh my gosh, this one was so popular that I’m actually going to do an update.

Here, according to our staff, are yet MORE movies featuring one actor playing two roles in the same frame, though we’ll just have to trust our collective memory on this one, because I can’t find pictures for some:

  • Scott Pilgrim saves the world – Michael Cera
  • Animal House – Tom Hulce (very briefly – The Devil/Angel confrontation)
  • Sherlock Jr. – Buster Keaton
  • Legend about the Kray Brothers – Tom Hardy
  • Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey
  • Dhoom 3
  • Adaptation – Nicolas Cage

And, the most requested movie we somehow don’t have: Last Action Hero.
Any more suggestions? I’m amusing myself with these until Counterpart returns.
As in, “Really Starz? You put a two week gap in a TWO PART EPISODE???”

Movies At Random: De-Lovely

Today’s random movie is De-Lovely (HU DVD 12337). Kind of mixed reviews according to Wikipedia, but hey, Kevin Kline is in it so how bad could it be. Also, Kevin Kline sings in it so it’s worth watching just for that. Here’s our summary: A musical portrait of American composer Cole Porter. The film imagines … Continue reading “Movies At Random: De-Lovely”

Today’s random movie is De-Lovely (HU DVD 12337). Kind of mixed reviews according to Wikipedia, but hey, Kevin Kline is in it so how bad could it be. Also, Kevin Kline sings in it so it’s worth watching just for that.

Here’s our summary:

A musical portrait of American composer Cole Porter. The film imagines Porter looking back on his life as a stage show, with past memories taking shape as numbers in an elaborate and elegant musical accompanied by his songs. His personal history is illustrated by these performances, especially the complicated relationship with his wife, wealthy socialite Linda Lee Porter, who is shown as being the main inspiration for his work despite his extramarital affairs.

And instead of the trailer, here’s the adorkable John Barrowman singing Night and Day:

Happy viewing!

Five Films Featuring…One Actor Playing Two Roles In The Same Frame

Certain members of the media services team are completely addicted to Counterpart, so for this week’s Five Films Featuring we’ve got…a single actor playing two roles in the same frame. 1. The Parent Trap (HU DVD 5305) Ummm…annoyingly, we only have the Lindsay Lohan version of this movie. BUT Natasha Richardson was one of my first … Continue reading “Five Films Featuring…One Actor Playing Two Roles In The Same Frame”

Certain members of the media services team are completely addicted to Counterpart, so for this week’s Five Films Featuring we’ve got…a single actor playing two roles in the same frame.

1. The Parent Trap (HU DVD 5305)

Ummm…annoyingly, we only have the Lindsay Lohan version of this movie. BUT Natasha Richardson was one of my first crushes, so I’ll let the general not awesomeness of this movie slide.

2. Dead Ringers (DVD 65)

Like the parent trap, but terrifying.

3. Being John Malkovich (HU DVD 91)

All the malkovich

4. Moon (HU DVD 7213)

Sam Rockwell and Sam Rockwell as Sam Rockwells on the Moon

5. Mary Poppins (HU DVD 7850)

The scene where her mirror is showing off. Gonna argue this one is in fact a different role, as mirrors are not ourselves…

And yes, honorable mention to Back to the Future, specifically Part II (HU DVD 7841):

Happy viewing! (Sparse commentary because I’m too busy reading reddit pages about Counterpart in preparation for the finale which has been moved to April 1st. HOW CRUEL IS THAT???)

Movies At Random: Sansho the Bailiff

Today’s random movie is Mizoguchi’s Sansho the Bailiff (HU DVD 5910). There are some super interesting essays on Criterion about this film, and I learned on Wikipedia that apparently Terrence Malick wrote a stage play based on the film! Here’s our summary: Based on a medieval Japanese folktale, this is a story of an aristocratic … Continue reading “Movies At Random: Sansho the Bailiff”

Today’s random movie is Mizoguchi’s Sansho the Bailiff (HU DVD 5910). There are some super interesting essays on Criterion about this film, and I learned on Wikipedia that apparently Terrence Malick wrote a stage play based on the film!

Here’s our summary:

Based on a medieval Japanese folktale, this is a story of an aristocratic family broken up by politics and slave traders has been considered Mizoguchi’s masterpiece. In feudal 11th century Japan, two noble children are sold into slavery to the tyrannical bailiff Sansho. Zushio grows up to accept the brutality of society, but his sister Anju adheres to humane principles, sacrificing herself so he can escape and find their mother, who had been sold into prostitution.

And here’s a teaser:

Happy viewing!

Five Films Featuring…the Bradbury Building

This week’s Five Films Featuring comes from Media/Tech teammate Kit Crawford! Take it away Kit! *** Watching movies is not just about what goes on with the characters on the screen, but can sometimes be just as enthralling with what goes on the in the background. Considering how much is CGI these days in film … Continue reading “Five Films Featuring…the Bradbury Building”

This week’s Five Films Featuring comes from Media/Tech teammate Kit Crawford! Take it away Kit!

***

Watching movies is not just about what goes on with the characters on the screen, but can sometimes be just as enthralling with what goes on the in the background. Considering how much is CGI these days in film it can be fascinating seeing slices of real life in older films. Whether it’s viewing 1980’s U St. in Mr. T’s early film D.C. Cab(1983),  watching Kevin Costner run from a non-existent Georgetown metro station in No Way Out (1987), or L.A.’s famous Randy’s Donuts that appears in numerous movies, including Iron Man 2 (2010) and Dope (2015). This week’s list pays homage to another ‘cinematic fetish location,’ the iconic Bradbury Building: an ordinary brick office building at 3rd and Broadway in downtown L.A.


1. M [1951 US remake] (Streaming Video)

2. Shockproof (DVD 7204)

3. The Artist (DVD 10193)


4. Marlowe (VHS 4877)

A VHS I know, but Bruce Lee kicks apart furniture in front of James Garner like a bad ass.


5. Blade Runner (DVD 1064)

Famously rendered as J.F. Sebastian’s decrepit apartment building and the climactic roof fight.

    Runner Ups: Disclosure (DVD 10714) relevant in today’s #metoo work culture, and (500) Days of Summer (DVD 8533) At the end when Joseph Gordon-Levitt goes in for a job interview.

    Movies At Random: Rice People

    Today’s film is Rithy Panh’s 1994 film Rice People (HU DVD 6120). According to Wikipedia, this film was the first Cambodian film submitted to the academy awards. Here’s our summary: In order to grow a successful rice crop, Poeuv and Om fight disease, snakes, and more. When Poeuv dies, Om must forge on to take … Continue reading “Movies At Random: Rice People”

    Today’s film is Rithy Panh’s 1994 film Rice People (HU DVD 6120). According to Wikipedia, this film was the first Cambodian film submitted to the academy awards.

    Here’s our summary:

    In order to grow a successful rice crop, Poeuv and Om fight disease, snakes, and more. When Poeuv dies, Om must forge on to take care of her seven daughters. The old world attitude that boys are assets and girls are burdens only adds to her troubles.

     No trailer for this one, but here’s the cover of the DVD:

    Happy viewing!

    Five Films Featuring…A Musical Number (but not in a musical)

    I personally love musicals, but I accept that the adorkability of, say, the ever under-appreciated Donald O’Connor is not every viewer’s cup of tea. Musical numbers make appearances in films for a variety of reasons, from romantic to ridiculous. Here are Five Films Featuring toe tapping ditties in films that are NOT musicals. 1. (500) … Continue reading “Five Films Featuring…A Musical Number (but not in a musical)”

    I personally love musicals, but I accept that the adorkability of, say, the ever under-appreciated Donald O’Connor is not every viewer’s cup of tea. Musical numbers make appearances in films for a variety of reasons, from romantic to ridiculous. Here are Five Films Featuring toe tapping ditties in films that are NOT musicals.

    1. (500) Days of Summer (HU DVD 8533)

    I think the musical number here might be attempting to say something about the rose colored glasses this character is wearing. Possibly. It’s too subtle to tell.

    2. History of the World, Part 1 (HU DVD 4108)

    This is how I prefer to learn history. The Animaniacs taught me the Nations of the World, Schoolhouse Rock taught me inane basic grammar I barely use, and this super-accurate representation of the inquisition taught me the value of topical phenylephrine in the Sephardic tradition.

    3. 10 Things I Hate About You (HU DVD 195)

    This film’s title is drawn from one of the greatest poems in the English language ever to be recited in a 1999 romantic comedy starring Julia Styles, the poem itself blooming from a love sown and nourished by this “night soil” cover of a truly fantastic Four Seasons song.

     

    4. Pretty In Pink (HU DVD 6848)

    I have thoughts about the “nice guy” gender politics in this movie, but my god, this is an epic lip-sync.

    5. Borat (HU DVD 2633)

    While it’s a stretch to call this a musical “number,” I feel like this scene really highlights the power of music to bring people together in a thoughtless, sonorous bliss. You can practically see Euterpe, muse of music, whispering in Borat’s ear and laying her gentle hand across those six strings, giving delight that transcends even nationality in a most divisive atmosphere. Art. True art.

    Honorable mention and bonus film this week is Forgetting Sarah Marshall (HU DVD 8701), specifically for this experiment in stream of consciousness songwriting:

    Happy viewing!

    Movies At Random: Moonfleet

    To call this selection random would be basically a lie. BUT unless you’re psychic you probably weren’t thinking of it, so it’s random for you! Moonfleet (HU DVD 7928) is a 1955 Fritz Lang film that, according to Wikipedia, was a critical and financial failure upon release, but was rated among the 100 most essential … Continue reading “Movies At Random: Moonfleet”

    To call this selection random would be basically a lie. BUT unless you’re psychic you probably weren’t thinking of it, so it’s random for you! Moonfleet (HU DVD 7928) is a 1955 Fritz Lang film that, according to Wikipedia, was a critical and financial failure upon release, but was rated among the 100 most essential films ever made by Cahiers du Cinema. Based on the immensely popular novel of the same name by J. Meade Falkner, who wouldn’t want to watch this swashbuckling romp?

    Here’s our summary:

    Eighteenth century smugglers beseige a small English village. A gothic melodrama of smuggling, intrigue and upper class decadence seen through the eyes of an eleven-year-old boy.

    And, as always, the trailer:

    Happy Viewing!

    Oscar Predictions 2018

    Today’s blog post is a truly excellent Oscars predictions article by Media/Tech Services team member Jean-Luc Botbyl. He is associate editor, writer, and host of the Comics Dash podcast @wethenerdy and, as it turns out, totally underutilized by our department because the below article is pretty damn awesome. Way to create work for yourself, buddy.You … Continue reading “Oscar Predictions 2018”

    Today’s blog post is a truly excellent Oscars predictions article by Media/Tech Services team member Jean-Luc Botbyl. He is associate editor, writer, and host of the Comics Dash podcast @wethenerdy and, as it turns out, totally underutilized by our department because the below article is pretty damn awesome. Way to create work for yourself, buddy.

    You can find Jean-Luc on Letterboxd as jlbotbyl and on twitter as @J_LFett, and hopefully back on this blog in the future.

    Take it away Jean-Luc!

    ***   ***   ***


    Jean-Luc: There’s a lot to unpack with some of these, and I’m probably going to go pretty long, so rather than write a long-winded introduction I’ll just dive right in to my predictions.

    Best Picture

    Best Picture is, in my opinion, the most hotly contested it’s been in years. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri was the early favorite, winning at both the Golden Globes and the BAFTAs. However, the film’s prospects have been hampered by a recent cavalcade of negative responses, leading me to believe Oscar voters will steer clear of it. So what will take home the top prize?
    This is the prediction I’m most unsure of, but I believe the Oscar for Best Picture will ultimately go to Shape of Water. Similarly to last year’s winner, Moonlight, Del Toro’s latest offers both a strong progressive message and fits the (admittedly harmful) perception of what counts as an “Oscar film.” Sure, it’s a little on the weird side, as Oscar winners go–but it also seems to be the film with the fewest strikes against it, in the minds of the voters.
    There is, however, one wild card: Get Out. The film won Best Film at last night’s Independent Spirit Awards, a ceremony with a strong track record of predicting Best Picture winners. Jordan Peele’s debut feature seemed to be out of contention thanks to unfair criticism from some Oscar voters, but this win puts it clearly back into the running.
    It is worth noting that Shape of Water was not one of the nominees at the Spirit Awards, which confuses the race even further. Ultimately, I’m sticking to my guns on this one.
    Prediction: Shape of Water


    Best Director

    Unlike Best Picture, Best Director appears to be a shoe-in for Guillermo Del Toro. He’s already won a number of major awards, including the Golden Globes, BAFTAs, and Critics’ Choice. If there is a last minute upset, it will likely be at the hands of Jordan Peele, winning for Get Out. This is a bit of a longer shot than Best Picture, if only because the consensus so clearly indicates a win for Del Toro. Regardless, it’s hard to be unhappy with any of the nominees in this category, which features a mix of excellent debuts and career best works from established directors.
    Prediction: Guillermo Del Toro


    Best Actor in a Leading Role

    Although Best Picture is hotly contested, this is the category I’ve had the most difficulty pinning down. Will the Academy give another nod to Daniel Day-Lewis as he exits the acting business? Or will a relative newcomer like Timothee Chalamet or Daniel Kaluuya be rewarded for fantastic performances? It’s hard to say, and as long as the winner isn’t Gary Oldman, you’ll hear no complaints from me.
    If I were forced to put money on it, I think Day-Lewis would barely edge out the competition. His work in Phantom Thread approaches a career-best performance, so the award would be well deserved. Is it a safe choice? Of course. But both Chalamet and Kaluuya have long careers ahead of them, likely with other shots at this award. And if Day-Lewis is to be believed, this is his final performance–and what better way for the Academy to honor him than with one last award?
    Prediction: Daniel Day-Lewis


    Best Actress in a Leading Role

    As much as I would like to say this is as hard to predict as the Best Actor field, Frances McDormand seems like an absolute lock for her performance in Three Billboards. Ultimately, her performance is the one part of the film everyone agrees to be award-worthy. There’s plenty of precedent for her win too–she’s emerged with equivalent awards virtually everywhere else.
    Honestly, the seeming lack of competition in this category is unfortunate. Both Saoirse Ronan and Sally Hawkins are technically in the conversation, and Meryl Streep is always hard for the Academy to pass up. As much as I would love to see Ronan win for her honest, gut-wrenching performance in Lady Bird, I just don’t see it happening.
    Prediction: Frances McDormand


    Best Actor in a Supporting Role

    A month ago, I would have told you the same things about Sam Rockwell I did about Frances McDormand. However, considering his character is central to the critiques of Three Billboards, I’m no longer as confident. Is he still the front-runner? Yes, definitely. The question becomes: who is his actual competition? Certainly not Woody Harrelson, for a solid-but-not-quite-as-good performance in the same film. Christopher Plummer? No–he stole every scene in All the Money in the World, but his nomination is symbolic more than anything. Which leaves Richard Jenkins (Shape of Water) and Willem Dafoe (The Florida Project). Of these two, Dafoe is likely Rockwell’s strongest competition. I believe Jenkins probably should win, and would take Dafoe over Rockwell. Yet, I can’t shake the feeling that Rockwell’s success in equivalent categories earlier this year will culminate in a way on the largest stage.
    Prediction: Sam Rockwell


    Best Actress in a Supporting Role

    It’s gotta be Laurie Metcalf right? Ultimately, her character is central to Lady Bird’s success, making up a significant portion of the film’s potent emotional core. In a field as stacked as this one, she certainly doesn’t have it locked up. The win could easily go to any of the other fantastic actresses nominated. That said, the excitement surrounding Metcalf’s performance has been intoxicating, and I feel safe predicting her win.
    Prediction: Laurie Metcalf


    Best Animated Feature Film

    Ah yes, the category allowing everyone to ironically attach the rider of “Oscar nominated film” to every future reference made to Boss Baby. Was it really so difficult for the Academy to nominate…. just about any other animated film? After all The Lego Batman movie did come out in 2017.
    So yeah, I’m a little bugged that it got snubbed. Even if it were to have been nominated, it wouldn’t change my predictions–this is ultimately a two film category. Coco and Loving Vincent are the two front runners, and both are treasures. Loving Vincent is truly unique among its peers, but if there’s one thing the Academy loves to honor, it’s Pixar. In addition to being a Pixar film, Coco represents an upswing in quality after The Good Dinosaur and Finding Dory, both of which received lukewarm responses. I would expect the lauded animation studio to pick up yet another award.
    Prediction: Coco


    Original Screenplay

    I legitimately have no idea which film wins this category. I think, again, Three Billboards is out of contention. The Big Sick’s writing is snappy and fun, but I’m not convinced it’s what the Academy is looking for. Which leaves Get Out, Shape of Water, and Lady Bird–all of which are tremendous for a range of different reasons. I’m firmly in Lady Bird’s camp (though that’s true of every category it’s nominated for), but I wouldn’t be surprised if it loses to either Get Out or Shape of Water.
    Prediction: Shape of Water


    Adapted Screenplay

    I didn’t much care for three out of the five films nominated in this category. Aaron Sorkin has never done anything for me, the best things about Logan have nothing to do with the script, and the Disaster Artist was competent at best. Of the two that remain, I prefer Call Me By Your Name to Mudbound, and believe the Academy will feel similarly. The film lives and dies on its screenplay, which may well be the year’s best overall.
    Prediction: Call Me By Your Name


    Cinematography

    Even as someone who wasn’t as taken by Blade Runner 2049 as everyone else seemed to be, I was consistently impressed by just how beautiful the film was to look at. In large part, I have Roger Deakins to thank for the state of awe I was in as the film committed a range of excellent moments to film. In my mind, there’s no real competition in this category.
    Prediction: Blade Runner 2049


    Costume Design

    Phantom Thread is a movie about fashion. Well, and a whole lot of other things, but c’mon. The protagonist (or antagonist, depending on how you look at things) is literally a designer! Yes, Beauty and the Beast was evocative of the animated film in the best ways, and Shape of Water’s costumes captured the era perfectly, so it’s hard to say for sure. Regardless of the competition, I’m going with Phantom Thread here.
    Prediction: Phantom Thread


    Original Score

    For as much as I love Star Wars, this is another category where Phantom Thread should pull through easily. Hans Zimmer did career-best work on Dunkirk, crafting a score woven into the film so seamlessly it became a storytelling device. Nevertheless, Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood put together a score just as essential to capturing the context and tone of Phantom Thread.
    Prediction: Phantom Thread


    Unfortunately, I can’t make well-informed predictions about Foreign Film, Documentary, or any of the Shorts categories. I wish I could, but they’re just starting to become readily available, and I simply haven’t been able to see enough of them yet. I was hoping to get through all of them before the Oscars, but unfortunately it looks like I won’t have all of them under my belt until the end of the month.